ARD501 Contextual Design – Bauhaus

Lecturer – Adam Cooke “The avant-garde had guts and vision. Most were young people. Just in their twenties. They wanted nothing less than to change the world” http://moodle.glyndwr.ac.uk/pluginfile.php/246541/mod_resource/content/1/Ard501ContextualBauhaus.pdf The third lecture I attended was about the Bauhaus. The Bauhaus was an art and design school based in Germany, operated 1919 to 1933. Bauhaus was first founded by Walter Gropious in Weimer and was then expanded into two other German cities, Dessau and Berlin. Although Bauhaus created what was and still is one of the most influential design ideas, it was closed down in 1933 by its own leadership after being put under pressure by the Nazi regime. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bauhaus What I found interesting about this lecture was the ideas and concepts Bauhaus came up with. Adam showed us the curriculum diagram Bauhaus would use. http://www.kase.co.za/patterns/content/story_03_03.htm The outer circle is what was considered as a ‘basic course’, we’d see it now as a foundation course.. This course had to be passed in order to carry on with the other three years of study. The next three years were broken up into sections of learning and by the third year you would decide what you were to study. “no difference between the beautiful and the strong sex” During this lecture Adam spoke of this quote that Walter Gropious said whilst talking about his students at Bauhaus. Adam explained that Gropious was trying to say the two sexes, male and female, were to be treated equal. I find this funny as he has completely contradicted himself in naming the different sexes ‘beautiful’ and ‘strong’. Also the female students were pushed to study crafts and materials whilst the male students were pushed towards wood work and metals. http://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2009/nov/07/the-women-of-bauhaus I enjoyed this lecture but I do find things to do with the Bauhaus uninteresting as I feel it relates more to art and craft students rather than film and photography as Bauhaus didn’t really study these areas.

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